Posts Tagged ‘Detroit’

By: Amy Cooper, Detroit Ginger


UPDATE 11/24/2015: As of 1PM Today, Eastown Theatre’s stage was torn down, and laid to rest. Check out the photos and videos here

 


HistoricDetroit.org just posted a statement proclaiming that Eastown Theatre will be demolished in the next few days, and that scrappers had destroyed the rest of the building.  What used to be a  2,500-seat theatre that housed multiple acts is now a ghost town, and a backdrop for urban explorers, hoping to relive some of the charm of the building now in it’s last days. 

We have learned the Eastown Theatre in #Detroit will be torn down in the next few days. The building has been destroyed…

Posted by HistoricDetroit.org on Wednesday, November 18, 2015

The building opened in 1931 to a film of Clark Gable’s called Sporting Blood, according to Historic Detroit‘s website, and closed it’s doors in the 90’s after changing hands from Rock, to Jazz, to a church group. 

Historic Detroit explains the late history of the building in great detail, prior to the scrappers attacking the final bones: 

“In recent years, a fire gutted the apartments in the complex. Decorative plaster lies in heaps everywhere, though there are still spots where the building’s original luster shines. The paint has worn from the proscenium arch in places. Likewise, busts of women on the walls, once beautiful coppers and gold, are now plain white, if still intact at all. The walls in the auditorium have been washed away from a faulty roof. The electric blue paint that had been slapped on the balcony is still there, even though big chunks of the balcony are not, having succumbed to water damage. The chandeliers and railings are gone, too, as are the moldy seats.” – Historic Detroit

Aug. 9, 2010, a fire lead to the main demise of the building, and left what is mostly seen in photographs till this day. So we bid adieu to the building that rocked hard, rolled soft, and housed many wonderful memories. 

UPDATE 4PM, 11/20/2015: 

Steve Neavling of Motor City Muckraker used the social network broadcast program Periscope to show the beginnings of the demolition of the building’s neighboring apartments, and believes that the theater portion itself will be demolished tomorrow. 

The theatre has said to have had acts like Joe Walsh, REO Speedwagon, The Doors, and more perform in it’s historical theatre, according to the Eastown Theatre Show List on MotorCityMusicArchives.com.

GALLERY: Eastown Theatre, August 2015

By: Amy Cooper, Detroit Ginger


“The role of imagination in Cave’s work is not escapism, but rather a strategy to negotiate the real life states of vulnerability and consequence.”  – ‘Greetings From Detroit’ 

Soundsuits in the Main Gallery Photo: Amy Cooper

Soundsuits in the Main Gallery Photo: Amy Cooper

Visiting Cranbrook Art Museum, you always partake in some sort of experience like any other, and this time was no exception. The in-depth look at Nick Cave‘s artwork was immensely interesting, and luckily in this experience, a first hand look with the curator of the exhibit, Laura Mott

An excerpt from the published piece in a private publication called The Grapevine by Amy Cooper (Myself)  reads as follows on the subject: 

“Nick Cave’s designs are what he calls “Soundsuits,” made of repurposed materials like sequins, fabrics, twigs, plastic, yarn, and anything else he can get his hands on.  Crafted for sound, mobility, and dance, the sound suits are used to create a sense of anonymity to the inhabitant of the suit. With this releases the bond of judgment on race, color, class, or physical appearance.”

“Mott explained that Cave looks at himself as a messenger, not an artist. “This isn’t a hobby. It’s art to create conversation.”  Within our tour, we received a firsthand account from Mott on how Cave’s process works, and were able to give her our feedback on impacting pieces, whether they be political, spiritual, or racial.  She shared with us Cave’s notion that the suits could inspire “collective dreaming” that would allow us to draw on the creative power of dreams.”

In addition to this, Laura was able to partake in days of filming with The Right Brothers and Nick Cave for video installations, and the visuals are absolutely stunning. After observing it once, one of my colleges stayed with me as we watched the video a second time, flabbergasted by the movement and watching the Soundsuits in action. 

The exhibit will be in operation for one more week, ending it’s stint on October 11, and admission is $10. If you’ve got the time, it’s a prime exhibit to visit and behold. To learn more, please visit Cranbrook’s Website

GALLERY OF EXHIBIT

By: Erica Banas, Lady Reporter


In 2014, the wildly popular “Pure Michigan” tourism campaign had a budget of $13 million.  While the campaign’s future seems shaky due to the recent downsizing of the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, one man is on a mission to help change people’s perception of Michigan, which when you boil it all down really translates to the way people see Detroit.

That man…is Michael Bolton.

Image Courtesy of Giphy

Image Courtesy of Giphy

No, not that one.  The real Michael Bolton.

Image Courtesy of Giphy

Image Courtesy of Giphy

Yes, everyone’s favorite no-talent ass clown is co-producing Gotta Keep Dreamin:  Detroit’s 21st Century Renaissance, a movie about all of the positive things going on in Detroit.  After having a chance to attend an exclusive preview screening of a few excerpts from the film, which also featured an interesting panel hosted by Mitch Albom (more on that in a bit), I almost regret referring to Bolton by the now infamous Office Space putdown, because this film is dripping with the kind of heart and soul not often found in “outsiders” who happen to be from one of the whitest state in the country.   (FYI:  I’m referring to Connecticut.)

I know what you’re all thinking:  “That sounds nice, but how in the hell did Mike even decide to make this movie?”  The answer is quite simple.  Initially, Bolton set out to make a film about Motown Records and the music it produced in the 1960s that heavily influenced his career.  While in the process of making that film, Bolton realized there was way more going on in the city that many people don’t know about, and that’s how the film’s focus changed, and it’s taken three-and-a-half years to get to this point.

The excerpts that were screened were filled with all the usual names that started off in Detroit and made it big:

Smokey Robinson
Aretha Franklin
Alice Cooper
Frances Ford Coppola (who proudly showed off his Shinola watch)…
Jerry Bruckheimer

…but they also focused on Veronika Scott, CEO/Founder of The Empowerment Plan and Jason Hall, co-founder of Detroit Bike City and Slow Roll, alongside the likes of Dan Gilbert and Christopher Ilitch, which is how the panels were structured as well.

Whether it was planned or not (we’re leaning toward the former), each industry titan represented in Gotta Keep Dreamin was paired up with a grassroots-type in the panel break coinciding with each film clip. 

And that’s part of the message of the film and of the Motor City itself.  Sure, the millionaires and billionaires have a lot of power on their side to cause change, but without the likes of Scott and Hall, there would simply be no spirit in Detroit.

Per Freep.com, Bolton and everyone involved with Gotta Keep Dreamin are aiming to have a final cut completed by October 14, which happens to be the deadline for submission to the Sundance Film Festival.  If the film makes the deadline and is then chosen to be screened at the famed Utah festival, Bolton will definitely earn honorary Detroiter status so much so that he could easily get away with this.

Image Courtesy of Facebook

Image Courtesy of Facebook

By: Amy Cooper, Detroit Ginger


Mixed Bag Art and Music Showcase Russell Industrial Center, 2015. Photo: ACRONYM

Mixed Bag Art and Music Showcase Russell Industrial Center, 2015. Photo: ACRONYM

If you are in the Detroit Art Scene, you know that it can be competitive, staunch, dramatic, but equally rewarding. It also always depends on who you are around and whether they are a class act, or a raving egotistical lunatic. The reason for pointing out this startling fact, is that the folks who starred in/created the Mixed Bag Art and Music Showcase this weekend are the good guys. 

Erron Reed, Victor Koos, Holly Hock, Ren Fracture, and the collection of Apathetic Zebra (Mickey Saldana, Kelly Karnesky, Risto Thomas, and Mitch Grygorcewicz) had a vast range of creativity, along with many thought provoking pieces. 


Thought provoking images of women spliced with startling statistics brings to mind the things we tend to miss when just seeing a photograph of a pretty girl. Photo: ACRONYM

Thought provoking images of women spliced with startling statistics brings to mind the things we tend to miss when just seeing a photograph of a pretty girl. Photo: ACRONYM

Mickey Saldana asked me during the evening “Which piece is your favorite?” and I honestly couldn’t pick just one. Looking at the creativity on the walls, in every medium, every visual, and being able to chat with some of the artists, it made me realize even more how much the curated scene in Detroit has to offer. 

Most of the artists that were in that room never get to come face to face with some of their idols of the internet, so speaking with people like Victor Koos, who I come in contact with via social media and see his shots of models in our collective space make it all the more worthwhile when viewing each other’s work. 

With the music of Feral Ground pulsating through the room, and PBR sponsorship, it was what one photographer, Jon DeBoer says “It’s like an Instagram meet but we’re not taking photos.” And truly, it was probably way better than an Instagram meet, and way more enriching. 

 

After experiencing this mingling session, here’s to hoping that Erron Reed and the rest of the posse will continue to have shows like this in the future. 

A collection of curated works from the multi-talented artists at the Mixed Bag.  Photo: ACRONYM

A collection of curated works from the multi-talented artists at the Mixed Bag.  Photo: ACRONYM


Artist / Musician Bios and Contact Info

Feral Ground
Fresh off of hosting their own three day music festival, FG brings their unique and thought provoking sound to the show. From their website…

“Feral Ground is an idea. The name itself embodies the concept that this world we live in is not as tame and placid as some would like you to believe it is. Our self appointed task is to show you that you haven’t heard everything yet, hip hop is not dying, and that people can be influenced by music in a positive way.  Feral Ground is more than just the sum of all its parts. Feral Ground is a new way of thinking. It is a way of thinking that is inclusive instead of exclusive, about family over the individual, about solutions beyond the problems, and most importantly, its about inspiring people to take control over their lives.”
 

Apathetic Zebra
We have Mickey Saldana, Kelly Karnesky and Risto Thomas along with Mitch Grygorcewicz. Apathetic zebra is a art collective including acting, video, photography and writing. And Mitch is a graffiti artist new and upcoming in Detroit.

Erron Reed
Erron has been a photographer based in Detroit for over 10 years and has been featured in many art shows nationally as well as locally. He will be bringing Portrait, abstract and landscape art to the show in a rare public showing.

Holly Hock
Holly is a self taught artist originally from the West Coast, now residing in Michigan. She is inspired largely by bygone eras and the macabre. She uses a variety of antique, vintage, salvaged and new elements to create unique assemblage and mixed media pieces.

Ren Fracture
Ren Fracture is a freelance artist from downriver Michigan, best known for illustrating hands and biographical comic strips. Ren uses comic strips to cope with ongoing depression, anxiety, and gender identity struggles. Ren Fracture became involved in the Detroit art scene in 2010 and has since exhibited in over 35 group shows.

Victor Koos
Victor’s photographic style can be broken down into two parts. Environment and Image Making. Working in Detroit Michigan, he is surrounded by one of the more unique landscapes on Earth. Whether he likes what he sees or not, makes no difference. He will shoot what is around him. Studying under Graphic Designer Brian Schorn, he was drawn to the term “visual resonance”, the idea of showcasing sound visually.

The information in this section was collected from the Event page on Facebook for the Mixed Bag Showcase. You can view that information here

By: Amy Cooper, Detroit Ginger


By: Acronym Creative Studio

By: Acronym Creative Studio

For people who love Movement but hate the PLUR, who love the good vibes and hate the crowds, and who love House and Techno, rather than Dubstep and Trap – this festival is just for you. 

On a gorgeous day in Belle Isle, you can’t get any better than Charivari. The stages are exuding prime music, when you want to take a break, you can chill on a blanket, and the free form, chill atmosphere is just what locals of Detroit love. 

Photo: Acronym Creative Studio

Photo: Acronym Creative Studio

Not only can you relax an take in music, there are local vendors, artists, and spaces for playing frisbee or dancing, because duh, it’s Belle Isle. 

Speaking with Patricia Lay-Dorsey, otherwise known to Detroit as Grandma Techno, she said that the crowd has steadily increased since it’s opened this morning. “It’s exactly what we need.”

The other great part about Charivari Detroit? There are all ages, all types, all races. You can’t map anyone into a particular category. From the local scene, there are many identifiable faces, but there are also many new faces. 

 

As of right now, there’s still a few more acts that are due to play, including Detroit House local favorite Golf Clap, but I’m calling it now – this is a success. 

Tomorrow’s lineup is extensive and a must see, including local sister-act Ghita Sisters (1-2 PM, Band Shell) and a power block from Detroit Techno Militia (3-4:30 PM, Band Shell). And let’s not forget the royalty children, Sanderson Brothers (9-10 PM, Red Stage). 

And for the techno snobs out there, we’ve got digital and vinyl spinners. Visit tomorrow starting at 12 PM.

Photo: Acronym Creative Studio

Photo: Acronym Creative Studio

By: Amy Cooper, Detroit Ginger


An artist painting the Pabst Blue Ribbon Bus Film Photo By Acronym Creative Studio

An artist painting the Pabst Blue Ribbon Bus Film Photo By Acronym Creative Studio

MOPOP 2015 was full of up and downs this year, and most things were due to issues beyond MOPOP Management’s control.

The set up and execution of the festival was well near perfect with the food trucks, beer tents, bathroom round up, and art to view all the way down the side of the riverfront. The spit of land works perfectly for festivals, leaving the concert goers to desire more festivals to be held across the street from the Detroit Post Office Headquarters.

The Crowd at MOPOP 2015 hanging out on the Riverwalk Strip. Film Photo By Acronym Creative Studio

The Crowd at MOPOP 2015 hanging out on the Riverwalk Strip. Film Photo By Acronym Creative Studio


Iron and Wine, 2015 Photo: Acronym Creative Studio

Iron and Wine, 2015 Photo: Acronym Creative Studio

DAY 1:

The issue came when rain began to pummel in during Iron and Wine‘s set – which forced photographers to hide underneath tarps, concert goers to take cover, and eventually be shoo’d away from the stages. 

MOPOP Management requested that most head to their cars to take cover, and with that came the unfortunate mishap that after waiting, some people left, in fear that the show had ended, and then left them up in arms for not being alerted that Brandon Flowers and Chromeo had returned to the stage. 

A MOPOP Patron Mud Sliding after Iron and Wine discontinued their set, pre-massive flooding. Photo: Acronym Creative Studio

A MOPOP Patron Mud Sliding after Iron and Wine discontinued their set, pre-massive flooding. Photo: Acronym Creative Studio

Mr. Brightside indeed #MoPopFest

A video posted by MoPop Festival (@mopopfestival) on Jul 25, 2015 at 7:22pm PDT

//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js

Many left heartbroken notes in regard to Brandon on the MOPOP Festival Instagram, saying that they were told to leave and they were furious and saddened by missing The Killers frontman. I happened to be the one of many who missed Flowers due to being told to leave, so I can share those sentiments.

Luckily, Flowers spoke to NME recently, in which he concluded that “Being onstage without [The Killers] is different, but I try to look for the similarities rather than dwell on the differences because I need that comfort, I guess,” and shared this might be his last solo record. So hopefully that means we will have more chances to see Brandon fronting The Killers instead. 

Concertgoer Bill Patzelt shared with DG that Flowers played for about a half hour, and then Chromeo went on until 11PM and was promptly cut short. 

I get Jealous! @chromeo #MoPopFest

A video posted by MoPop Festival (@mopopfestival) on Jul 25, 2015 at 7:57pm PDT

//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js


DAY 2:

The second day of the festival was a lot more dry in terms of the weather. All the artist played and played on time, except for Passion Pit. Sadly, they were out due to an ilness in the band, which left many of the concert goers, once again, heartbroken.

MOPOP did not release the information of sickness until the morning of, which was frustrating for some of the people who’d bought tickets just to see Passion Pit, or worse, had TRAVELED to see them. Fans were lamenting on Instagram and Facebook of the lineup change. 

Due to ongoing illness, Passion Pit's performances at WayHome Music & Arts Festival in Oro Medonte, Canada on 7/25 and…

Posted by Passion Pit on Friday, July 24, 2015

Jessica Hernandez & The Deltas Film Shot By Acronym Creative Studio

Jessica Hernandez & The Deltas Film Shot By Acronym Creative Studio

On the bright side, Jessica Hernandez & The Deltas were the new fan favorite, with the local fronting the band. “Don’t Take My Man To Idaho” was the favorite mover and shaker, and Jessica made sure that the crowd knew how proud she was to hail from Detroit.

Then, for the grand finale, Modest Mouse.  Though nobody could really understand Milo speaking to the crowd (we’re sure he was on something), they sounded identical to their recordings, as they played “World at Large” off of “Good News for People Who Love Bad News.”

They were worth the wait during the set, and it sealed the weekend off perfectly. If given the chance, I would most definately go to MOPOP again, and hope to see what it’s like when there’s not a massive rainstorm that wrecks the first day. 

By: Amy Cooper, Detroit Ginger


Photo: Acronym Creative Studio

Photo: Acronym Creative Studio

A teen from North Carolina, Cassie Mattheis, set off to Detroit with the 2015 ELCA Youth Gathering, as an ongoing worship to life, and to show the world their faith through community service projects. 

When Cassie returned home, she penned THE BEST letter, showing the world that Detroit was not as bad as the media makes it out to be. 

She says in her post, “… I was expecting a city filled with broken dreams and shattered glass, a city devoid of life and hope. I expected a scene of desolation against the backdrop of a dead city. But you are not dead. You are so very much alive.”

We are so happy and thankful that someone like Cassie came along to share what she saw. It helps us realize that though we still have a long way to go, that people are noticing that we are up and coming, and that we will not be taken for granted.

And, it’s a great post to have today, on Detroit’s 314th Birthday. 

Thank you to the Detroit Free Press for sharing the post with the rest of the city.